International Benefits

Foundation Publication Search Results

These summaries were compiled from Foundation Publications Search, a database of articles, research reports and books published by the International Foundation and the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists.


Globally Vocal: Real Talk From Expats.
Peters, Craig; Weltz, Frank; NewsBriefs; v35 pp 12-14 1st Qtr 2017; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : The National Foreign Trade Council and Cigna Global Health Benefits sponsored the "2015 Global Mobility Trends" survey to study how globally mobile employes experience, perceive and value elements of their assignment terms and programs. Based on the authors' presentation and the 2016 Symposium.
[0200445]

Link To Full Article
Navigating Challenging Markets When Relocating Employees.
Douiyssi, Diane; Benefits Magazine; v54 no1 pp 14-19 Jan 2017; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : China, Brazil and India continue to be among the top five countries emerging as destinations for international assignments. They and other emerging markets also continue to be among the most challenging locations to send people.
[0200404]

Link To Full Article
The Global Economy: Trends and Predictions Turning Today Into Tomorrow.
Vogel, Chris; CEBS Advantage; v34 no3 pp 13-14 Dec 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : In the keynote presentation at the 2016 Symposium, the author discussed global economic transformations and technological changes that will change the workplace and employee benefits.
[0200423]

Link To Full Article
Fringe Benefit: Taking Time to Vote.
Benefits Magazine; v53 no11 p 82 Nov 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : No federal law says employers must make sure employees have time to vote November 8. But plenty of states do have such laws--and some have real teeth: Employers face steep fines and even jail time for bucking them.
[0200349]

Link To Full Article
The Global Economy: Trends and Predictions Turning Today Into Tomorrow.
Vogel, Chris; NewsBriefs; v34 pp 16-18 4th Qtr 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : In the keynote presentation at the 2016 Symposium, the author discussed global economic transformations and technological changes that will change the workplace and employee benefits.
[0200396]

Link To Full Article
Using Employee Benefits to Stay Competitive in China and India.
Kannan, Bharat; Benefits Quarterly; v32 no3 pp 32-36 3rd Qtr 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : It appears a talent war is here to stay among employers in Asia. Employers that stay ahead of the trends and make best use of new insights will be better equipped to attract talent, increase loyalty and boost productivity. MetLife research shows there is a huge opportunity in China and India for employers that adopt practices such as offering total rewards packages that include a well-rounded employment deal that factors in flexible working conditions, wellness and career advancement opportunities. This article reviews these research findings and argues that taking the right steps to innovate on employee benefit programs will not only help companies stand apart from the competition but also help foster an engaged and committed workforce.
[0200239]

Link To Full Article
Fringe Benefit: Making Employees Happy.
Benefits Magazine; v53 no6 p 74 Jun 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : The United States was 13th among the 157 countries ranked by the World Happiness Report 2016, which measures happiness based on how people rate their lives on a ladder scale. Health and welfare benefits and pensions play a part in healthy life expectancy, trust and freedom to make life choices.
[0200200]

Link To Full Article
Other Recent Decisions.
Benefits Magazine; v53 no6 pp 67-69 Jun 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Summarizes cases on benefit litigation, retirement benefits, withdrawal liability and statute of limitations.
[0200199]

Link To Full Article
Multinational Employers Need to Mind the Gap.
Miskel, John; Benefits Magazine; v53 no5 pp 32-36 May 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : As income protection becomes a growing concern for workers around the globe, employers can demonstrate that they care for their employees by helping to close the gaps.
[0200146]

Link To Full Article
Protecting a Global Workforce in a Changing World.
Hill, Jason A.; Benefits Magazine; v53 no5 pp 26-31 May 2016; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : A benefit package for multinational workers may need to take into account risks they face in many parts of the world.
[0200145]

Link To Full Article
Interest in Voluntary Benefits Rising Across the Globe.
Trohanis, Wil; Benefits Magazine; v52 no10 pp 42-47 Oct 2015; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : The trend toward using voluntary benefits to supplement core benefits is expanding internationally. Aon Health expects global voluntary benefits to mushroom by 2020, and MetLife research in ten countries from 2013 to 2015 confirms employees' growing interest. Drivers of the trend are the shift in financial responsibility to employees, evolving consumer preferences and demands and technology to simplify decision making and transactions. A well designed voluntary benefits plan can balance traditional health care and social security services. Surveys show demographic changes in some countries bringing greater incomes and desire to protect assets, interest in a broader range of voluntary benefits and expanding use of technology to facilitate choices and interactions. Employers using voluntary benefits should rely on an experienced consultant, roll out products gradually, educate employees as consumers and promote the program as evidence of support for employees.
[0167367]

Link To Full Article
Know "What Matters" in Global Workplace Well-Being.
Beichl, Lisa; Benefits Magazine; v52 no1 pp 16-21 Jan 2015; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Multinational companies must be aware of differences between countries and cultures that can interfere with an effective global wellness program. One should not assume the same awareness, values, viewpoints, approaches and priorities exist in all locations. An effective program must be based in the culture and adapted to suit local circumstances. Addressing health promotion may be more successful if oriented toward manager training and worker interaction rather than expecting individuals to take advantage of unfamiliar assistance programs imported from another culture. Firms should understand what is relevant for their workforce populations, consider local and national risk data and provide customized solutions that are meaningful to employees.
[0166346]

Link To Full Article
ACA's Impact on Global Workforces.
Bergner, Amy; Waidmann, Anne; Benefits Magazine; v51 no9 pp 24-29 Sep 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : The shared responsibility mandate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) pertains to every employer with an international workforce employing U.S. citizens and residents as well as foreign nationals working in the U.S.. All must have affordable, minimum essential coverage. Both U.S. and foreign firms with 50 or more full-time workers must comply with the mandate. The mandate's applicability depends on eligibility for the U.S. foreign earned income tax exclusion, coverage under a plan that meets requirements and the time the employee spends out of the country, a factor that may be hard to predict each year. Both domestic and non-U.S. parent and subsidiary companies must be aware of health coverage for U.S. employees wherever they work and for foreign workers inbound to the U.S., as well as the U.S. tax reporting obligations associated with the ACA.
[0165820]

Link To Full Article
Attention JATCs: It's Our Time to Shine.
Gromada, Alex; Tierney, Ron; Gaal, John S.; Benefits Magazine; v51 no9 pp 44-49 Sep 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : A 2011 Harvard Graduate School of Education report and subsequent conferences have explored vocational education and apprenticeships as alternatives to college, presenting successful European models. The Swiss apprenticeship model involves the national and state governments, industry groups and sponsoring employers. A standardized curriculum enables worker mobility throughout the region, uses certified instructors at all levels, and includes a balance of practical training and theory that ties to university education. The St. Louis Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Program, designed in 2013, and two earlier programs provide two-year technical instruction for high school juniors and seniors based on the Swiss model. They show how Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committees (JATCs) can increase access to registered apprenticeship programs, helping bridge the often cited skills gap in the U.S.
[0165823]

Link To Full Article
2014 Global Top Five Total Rewards Priorities Survey.
Mrkvicka, Neil; NewsBriefs; v32 pp 10-11 3rd Qtr 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Deloitte, the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists and the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans sponsored the second global survey of total rewards priorities. Covering employers in 22 countries, the 2014 poll revealed the top concerns to be using total rewards to attract, motivate and retain employees, the costs of benefits, maintaining motivation on a limited budget, demonstrating return on investment for compensation outlays and forming a total compensation program that fits an organization's culture and goals. The cost of total rewards was a major concern, especially for employers in the Americas. Only half of the companies are satisfied with their total rewards strategy. Most employers have taken or plan to take action to boost health and wellness and to improve employee communications, especially on the value of total rewards. Compensation design changes focus on variable pay and pay for performance.
[0165802]

Link To Full Article
Finding, Motivating and Retaining Talent a Global Priority.
Mrkvicka, Neil; Benefits Magazine; v51 no7 pp 8-9 Jul 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : A second annual survey on total rewards gathered opinions from employers in 22 countries. Administered by Deloitte, the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists and the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans, the survey identified attracting, motivating and retaining talent to be respondents' top priority and challenge. Other top priorities were benefit costs, motivating staff with limited budgets, showing return on investment in reward spending and developing a culturally appropriate reward program. Compared with other countries, benefit costs and delivering health and wellness benefits were stressed more by countries in the Americas. Survey responses showed growing interest in variable and performance-based pay, tied to expanded employee communication and education emphasizing the value of various benefits.
[0165515]

Link To Full Article
Generational Preferences Create Challenges for Modern Mobility Strategies.
Mullaney, Eileen; Benefits Quarterly; v30 no3 pp 38-40 3rd Qtr 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Mobility programs are critical both for successful global operations as well as being useful for attracting, retaining and engaging talent. Mobility assignments are evolving to include greater numbers of both younger employees and shorter assignments. Older employees tend to be more trusting of and loyal to their employers, but also more entrenched in their current locations. Younger employees are less loyal and more interested in personal benefit or interest than in recognition from their employers. Mobility managers should embrace a modern philosophy that addresses these generational differences and is flexible and broad enough to interest all generations. However, a mobility program should always support short-term business goals as well as long term employee development goals.
[0165762]

Link To Full Article
Competitive Health Care Plans: Looking Beyond Price.
Tyler, Mike; Juniper, Bridget; Benefits Magazine; v51 no2 pp 47-52 Feb 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Health plan sponsors interested in exploring competitive plans may think of competitiveness within a market or cost bracket, but they should stay focused on effectiveness. Multinational employers must appreciate that countries around the world take different approaches to health coverage, making direct comparison difficult. Inflation in medical costs further complicates the issue. Sponsors must determine whether their primary goal for competitiveness applies to overall cost, specific interventions, benchmarking for recruitment and retention purposes or enhanced employee performance. Employers should consider the aim of their health program, the indicators of program success and vendors' delivery of a measurably successful program. A health care consultant may be useful for identifying a program that is both competitive and effective for an organization.
[0164985]

Link To Full Article
Foreign Company Liable for Acquired Termination Liability.
Benefits Magazine; v51 no2 pp 70-71 Feb 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : The district court for the District of Columbia ruled in Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation v. Asahi Tec Corporation that the defendant Japanese company became jointly and severally liable for pension plan termination premiums when it acquired a U.S. company that later went bankrupt. The defendant proceeded with a merger despite a consultant's report on the company's underfunded obligations. When the company filed for bankruptcy, the PBGC sought payment of unfunded liabilities from the defendant as a controlled group member. The court determined the defendant knew of the company's liability, the fact that it was governed by ERISA and the issue of controlled group liability when it negotiated the purchase price. The court also determined it has specific jurisdiction over the defendant and upheld the PBGC's imposition of joint and several liability for termination costs.
[0164978]

Link To Full Article
Harnessing the Power of Health and Wellness Programs: Multinational Strategies.
Peiffer, Jim; Benefits Magazine; v51 no1 pp 16-21 Jan 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : A global approach to employee wellness can help build and maintain a strong workforce and contain medical expenditures. An effective program for a multinational company is based on a consistent framework, adapted to local markets and employee needs. The program should be driven by the company's vision and goals for employee health, but with solutions adjusted for local cultural norms, attitudes and habits. Visible support from upper management is essential. Local implementations of the global program should be based on data about health issues and costs. Innovative and pragmatic approaches are important, and small scale efforts can be very effective. Ideal communication channels may vary by location. Employee input should be gathered before, during and after program development and implementation.
[0164818]

Link To Full Article
Longevity Insurance Annuities: Lessons From the United Kingdom.
Blake, David; Turner, John A.; Benefits Quarterly; v30 no1 pp 39-47 1st Qtr 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : U.S. insurers are showing some interest in longevity insurance annuities, which pay out only at advanced age. While longevity carries the obvious risk of running out of money, it can also cause retirees to spend too cautiously and leave behind unintended bequests. Proposed Treasury Department regulations would make it clear that qualified longevity insurance annuities would not be restricted by minimum distribution requirements. While the U.K. at one time offered such annuities, as of 2014 it does not, due largely to proposed European Union life insurance rules that would recognize the lack of an effective hedge against longevity and require large capital reserves to cover longevity risk. The authors propose a longevity bond scheme that would help hedge against longevity risk.
[0165164]

Link To Full Article
Types of Global Workers.
Stitch, Julie; Sanchez, Mary; Benefits Magazine; v51 no1 pp 8-9 Jan 2014; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Employers should understand distinctions between expatriates and inpatriates, foreign and local nationals and third-country nationals, nonresident aliens and permanent residents, and global nomads and international commuters. Also important are designations of base country, home country and host country and the kinds of documentation required for each type of worker. The article also includes an explanation of three approaches to counting nonhourly employees for purposes of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
[0164824]

Link To Full Article
Asset Allocation: The Evolution of Multiemployer Pension Investing.
Waite, Jonathan; Benefits Magazine; v50 no10 pp 22-27 Oct 2013; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Reports in 2013 from the PBGC and the Government Accountability Office highlight underfunding and solvency concerns with multiemployer pension plans. When multiemployer plans were first created in the 1940s, allocations were very simple and conservative, but the search for greater returns led them to include equity investments. In the 1990s, stock returns soared, and in 1999 74 percent of multiemployer plans were fully funded. When the tech bubble burst at the turn of the millennium, many plans became underfunded and had to use their accumulated excess contributions to meet minimum funding requirements. In 2006, as funds were recovering, the Pension Protection Act put stronger funding requirements in place, but even then, 75 percent of multiemployer plans were over 80 percent funded in 2007. The market crash of 2008 left U.S. multiemployer plans 52 percent funded in aggregate as of March 2012, with 40 percent of multiemployer plans having a 2012 endangered or critical status according to Segal. In 2013 and beyond, alternative investments, foreign equities, fixed income, discretionary investment management and dynamic asset allocation are expected to rise as multiemployer funds struggle to improve pension health.
[0164410]

Link To Full Article
Small-Cap Investing Without Borders.
Pontius, Blake; Benefits Magazine; v50 no7 pp 46-51 Jul 2013; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : U.S. investors hold a strong preference for domestic stocks, constituting over 71 percent of their portfolios in 2012, according to Vanguard. But the percentage is slowly falling as globalization becomes an increasingly important aspect of investing. National borders present no barriers in a location neutral strategy that dramatically widens choices and increases the flexibility to seek the best options worldwide. Though global strategies may favor large and heavily capitalized multinational corporations, investors should be alert to alpha performance opportunities among small cap global investments. Potential is particularly strong in Asian emerging markets.
[0164002]

Link To Full Article
2013 Top Five Global Employer Rewards Priorities Survey.
Newsbriefs; v31 no2 pp 7-8 2nd Qtr 2013; journal article

Availability : International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans
Abstract : Survey responses from HR professionals from 27 countries in the Americas, Europe, Middle East, Africa (EMEA) and the Asia-Pacific region indicate talent management to be the top priority for all, driven by global competition. The drive to attract, retain and reward employees is followed by the need to clearly align rewards with overall business strategy. Finer differences show skill development the top HR priority in the Americas, motivating staff despite a limited budget most important in the EMEA countries, and maintaining competitive pay the biggest challenge in the Asia-Pacific region. On a personal level, HR respondents in EMEA nations focus on job security, on retirement security in the Americas and extra earnings in Asia-Pacific countries. The survey was sponsored by Deloitte, the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists and the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans.
[0163931]

Link To Full Article