Conference Schedule

Core Conference Session Schedule

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Wednesday April 10, 2024
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET
Keynote Session: Reducing Health Disparities by Improving Relationships in Health Care
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET

The quality of a patient-physician relationship influences a patient's comprehension and retention of information, adherence to treatment and consistency in care, contentment with the medical services received and confidence in their physician. The patient-physician relationship also influences clinical outcomes such as pain reduction, resolution of depression, and control of diabetes and hypertension. However, not all patients benefit from positive relationships with their physicians. This presentation will describe studies that document racial disparities in relationship-centered care as well as the associations between implicit biases among physicians and disparities in the quality of the patient-physician relationship. The presentation will then define relationship-centered care, an important framework for conceptualizing health care that considers the unique experiences, values, and perspectives of patients, clinicians, and all other participants in health care. It will also discuss the role of relationship-centered care in addressing racial disparities in care.

After this session, attendees will be able to:

  • Identify relationship dimensions in which racial disparities have been documented
  • Describe individual-level relationship-centered intervention approaches that can reduce racial disparities in health care
  • Discuss organizational-level approaches to reduce disparities in the quality of relationships in healthcare
Category: Health & Wellness
Lisa A. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H.
Speaker
Lisa A. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H.
Founder and Director; James F. Fries Professor of Medicine; Bloomberg Distinguished Professor
Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity and Urban Health Institute; Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Bloomberg School of Public Health
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
A Systems-Based Approach to Achieving Health Equity in Well-Being Programs
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Since their popularization in the second half of the 20th century, worksite well-being programs have been focused on participant engagement and outcomes. Early evaluation efforts explored the difference between participants and non-participant outcomes, with the understandable goal of measuring program value. Given that the preponderance of programs have been vendor-sponsored, this objective has been important for the sake of maintaining existing employer clients and attracting new ones. However, the emphasis on program outcomes has significantly and unfortunately - shifted the focus of both vendors and employers away from program non-participants. As a result, employers and vendors alike have become accustomed to accepting participation rates in the 50 percent range as an acceptable "normal".

Growing awareness of health inequities in the United States — and particularly individuals with employer-sponsored insurance—has prompted a critical evaluation of inequities in workforce well-being and employer-provided program offerings. Are these programs accessible and relevant to all members of the workforce? Do they provide equitable value for all employees and their family members? Or do they inadvertently worsen health inequities?

The goal of this session is to bring attention to well-being program non-participants by providing insight into their perspectives and experience. Included is an exploration of reasons and systems-based barriers contributing to non-participation, as well as a discussion of the ways to thoughtfully address these issues and foster enhanced workforce health equity.

Category: Health & Wellness
Bruce Sherman, M.D.
Co-Speaker
Bruce Sherman, M.D.
Medical Advisor; Adjunct Associate Professor
National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions; University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Emily Stiehl, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Emily Stiehl, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
University of Illinois at Chicago
Preethi Pratap, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Preethi Pratap, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Empowered Refusal: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

In this interactive workshop, Dr. Patrick will share:

  • Why empowered refusal is a valuable superskill to help you say "no" in a way that does not invite pushback from others.
  • How to identify why you sometimes say "yes" when you want to say "no "
  • A practical lens that helps you separate the “good-for-me” from the “not-good-for-me” activities and engagements that come your way.
  • A toolkit of three competencies you need to effectively communicate an empowered "no" response.
  • A framework to establish and implement personal policies that empower your refusal.
  • How to use empowered refusal to manage difficult askers, strengthen your relationships and realize your full potential.

Category: Health & Wellness
Vanessa Patrick, Ph.D.
Speaker
Vanessa Patrick, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Research, Executive Director of Doctoral Programs (PhD/DBA) & Bauer Professor of Marketing
Bauer College of Business, University of Houston
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
How Good Strategy Can Take Your Workforce Mental Health Efforts to the Next Level
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Mental health remains a priority for many employers, but too often, actions are ad hoc, reactive and fragmented, and the actions fail to deliver significant and sustainable results. Although new guidance has emerged in recent years, challenges remain in translating these resources into practice and tailoring efforts to meet the needs of an organization and its workforce. As a result, few employers have a concrete strategy and implementation of comprehensive, evidence-based workforce mental health efforts lags far behind physical health and wellness practices in most organizations. With economic pressures looming and resources stretched thin, mental health programs are also competing with other organizational priorities and run the risk of being reduced or eliminated if they don’t produce demonstrable results and deliver value. Unfortunately, this is unlikely to occur without strategic actions.

This session will focus on the process of developing a concrete mental health strategy for your organization and the elements of a comprehensive plan. Following a brief overview of guidance from the ISO, the World Health Organization, and the U.S. Surgeon General, the presenters will focus on practical ways to improve your efforts regardless of whether you are just starting out or looking to strengthen a well-established program. By reviewing the key parts of a mental health strategic plan, hearing case examples from organizations that have achieved success, and discussing how to apply the lessons learned in their own organizations, participants will be better positioned to develop a workforce mental health strategy that gets results.

Category: Health & Wellness
David W. Ballard, Psy.D., M.B.A.
Co-Speaker
David W. Ballard, Psy.D., M.B.A.
Founder and Principal
GhostNote Consulting
Krystal Sexton, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Krystal Sexton, Ph.D.
Global Health Analytics Manager
Shell
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Psychedelic-Assisted Therapies: Science, Application and Health Equity
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

The psychedelic renaissance is fully underway, evidenced by exponential growth in the scientific literature examining psychedelic compounds as medicines. The primary focus is on the treatment of mental illness, but psychedelic therapies may also benefit other health conditions, especially given their anti-inflammatory effects. Shifts in the regulatory and business environment are occurring rapidly and there is hope for potent and long-lasting healing. From a health equity perspective, however, there is a problem. These therapies are expensive, mostly not reimbursed by employers as a qualified medical expense, and are not particularly inclusive (e.g., more than 80% of participants in psychedelic clinical trials are white, and most are cisgender and straight). In this session, we will examine the science of psychedelic therapies, their potential application in health promotion and in the workforce, and equity issues in research and implementation. Dr. Swoap will present a study of a psychedelic-assisted therapy used in a group setting and discuss the costs and benefits of ketamine-assisted therapy using this modality.

Category: Health & Wellness
Bob Swoap, Ph.D.
Speaker
Bob Swoap, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Expressive Arts Therapy
Warren Wilson College
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
The Need for FUNdamental Skills Training for Effective, Equitable and Sustainable Health Promotion
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

As health promotion professionals, many of us were trained in the core public health competencies including planning, implementing, evaluating and researching. However, curricula often leave out the core human skills of public health and life—resilience, authenticity, vulnerability, flexibility, compassion and more. Research highlights the importance of interpersonal and intrapersonal skills training and application for more effective health promotion as well as more engaged, flexible and resilient health promotion professionals (McPhee 2022).

To intentionally and holistically work to mitigate systemic health inequities, health promotion professionals must have learning environments where they can be authentic, share their lived experiences, and feel safe to have challenging conversations. We must be trained to create space for these vulnerable conversations, particularly because avoiding them or engaging in them with untrained staff often unwittingly replicates the dominant power structures that perpetuate inequities (Muldoon 2021). We can no longer “take the privileged path of least resistance” by avoiding conversations about discrimination because they may be challenging and certainly will be personal because health impacts all of us (Acosta & Ackerman-Barger 2017).

Applied improvisation is a well-suited and deeply experiential methodology for this training that enables individuals to practice these skills in a low-stakes, creative environment before needing to utilize them in high-intensity situations because it is “grounded in a culture of support and feedback” (Fu 2019). In this breakout session, there are built-in opportunities for participants to connect and be vulnerable while making meaningful applications to their work and life.

Category: Health & Wellness
Dayna Gowan, M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Dayna Gowan, M.P.H.
Speaker, Improvisor, Facilitator of Fun
Improvly Speaking
Jesse Greenfield, M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Jesse Greenfield, M.P.H.
Founder, Director of Programming & Facilitator-in-Chief
Kaleidoscope Training Center
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Do Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs Work? What Does the Latest Research Tell Us?
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Dr. Ron Goetzel will provide an update on the most recent workplace health promotion research studies including those that address the controversy of whether workplace health and wellbeing programs are effective across multiple outcome measures. He will also address the shift from a return-on-investment (ROI) rationale for these programs to one that emphasizes value-on-investment (VOI).

The session will introduce the APIE Model as a methodology to "Assess, Plan, Intervene and Evaluate" the effectiveness of programs, including business case development, program design, effective implementation and rigorous evaluation. Controversial issues will be addressed including why many well-intentioned programs fail and what ethical standards need to be addressed in designing programs that satisfy the needs of employers and diverse employee populations.

Category: Health & Wellness
Ron Z. Goetzel, Ph.D.
Speaker
Ron Z. Goetzel, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist and Director of the Institute for Health and Productivity Studies (IHPS)
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Integrating Mindfulness Into Your Workplace Culture
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) is integrating mindfulness into the workplace culture through a "mindful" approach of addressing six well-being culture building blocks:

  • Norms
  • Peer support
  • Leadership engagement
  • Social climate
  • Shared values
  • Culture connection points
  • The mindfulness program began in 2020 with the funding approval for a new, full-time, certified mindfulness instructor to join the office of well-being. Only a handful of large organizations employ a certified mindfulness instructor full time (including JHM). While mindfulness has grown to be a broadly adopted individual well-being strategy, it has not yet achieved widespread acceptance by the business community as a strategy to implement within an organization. JHM's mindfulness program includes several specific initiatives including "Live & Work Mindfully", Mindful Monday, the integration of mindfulness into new employee and new manager orientations as well as other institutional events, and the incorporation of mindfulness into ID badges, computer screen savers, and more. Come learn how to strategically position mindfulness within your organizations.

Category: Health & Wellness
Jennifer Salaverri
Co-Speaker
Jennifer Salaverri
Health Promotion Specialist - Mindfulness
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Richard Safeer, M.D.
Co-Speaker
Richard Safeer, M.D.
Chief Medical Director, Employee Health and Well-being
Johns Hopkins Medicine
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Meeting the Needs of Many: Health Promotion and Health Equity in Ever-Changing Environments
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

In these unprecedented times, health promotion professionals are responsible for engaging with communities to enhance their understanding of factors that contribute as risks or protections for their health outcomes. Equity in these engagements is vital in ensuring communities receive palatable insights, information, and guidance to optimize population health. These efforts are highly intricate and require integration of classical scientific theory and research applied to contemporary socio-cultural factors. Equity in health promotion requires customized considerations and data-driven efforts to define and assess community compositions, disaggregate original data sources, and develop multi-sector community partnerships. Also, addressing issues that marginalized and underserved communities experience from public health and other systems is critical in recognizing additional efforts that are necessary to build equity and trust in health promotion. By leveraging additional partnerships, health promotion professionals can further optimize ways to meet educational needs of underserved populations in their respective locales. Through combing these components, health promotion professionals can effectively define and apply health education and risk reduction efforts to all communities without bias and in terms they can understand and benefit. The contribution is invaluable to the art and science of public health and to the wellness of populations.

Category: Health & Wellness
Tralonda Triplett, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Speaker
Tralonda Triplett, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Director of Operations
Institute for Successful Leadership, Inc.
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Nature for All: Increasing Access to Nature Among Diverse Populations
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Spending time in natural environments conveys a variety of physical and mental health benefits including decreased blood pressure, improved immune function, decreased anxiety, and overall restoration. While nature is often viewed as a free resource, there are numerous barriers that keep many populations from fully benefiting from nature. Factors such as access, safety, experience, cost and time as well as racism, discrimination and land-based trauma all affect the relationship and sense of belonging to nature for different communities. This interactive session will start by exploring some historical relationships between BIPOC and natural environments and how these impact time spent in nature today. Next, big data tools including cell phone records and social media scraping will be explored to measure current disparities. Finally, we will explore current programs designed to increase access to nature for all and eliminate current disparities. Participants will leave with action-based strategies to enhance time spent in nature in their worksites and communities.

Category: Health & Wellness
Jay Maddock, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Jay Maddock, Ph.D.
Director of the Center for Health and Nature; Regents Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
Houston Methodist Research Institute; Texas A & M University
Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Associate Professor; Director of Public Health Outcomes and Effects of the Built Environment Laboratory; Co-Director of NatureRx
University of Maryland
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
The Journey of National Native Networks: Past, Present and Future
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

The National Native Network (NNN) is a–CDC-funded, national network of Tribes, tribal organizations and health programs supporting the prevention of commercial tobacco use and cancer among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations across the U.S. The NNN is administered by the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan (ITCM) and operates in collaboration with the California Rural Indian Health Board (CRIHB), the Great Plains Tribal Leaders’ Health Board (GPTLHB), and the South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC). As part of a community of tribal and tribal-serving public health programs, the NNN offers technical assistance and culturally relevant resources and shares up-to-date information and lessons learned. The focus of this session will be on how the NNN was created, expanded and evolved over the years through collaboration and partnerships, while using programmatic and evaluation data to identify areas for growth.

Category: Health & Wellness
Chiharu Kato, M.A., Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Chiharu Kato, M.A., Ph.D.
Research Scientist
Michigan Public Health Institute
Heather Medicine Bear, M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Heather Medicine Bear, M.P.H.
Manager, National Native Network
Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Going Beyond Bias to Break the Labeling Cycle of Patient/Client Resistance to Lifestyle Improvement
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

There is strong evidence base that implicit bias can have negative, if not disastrous, effects upon medical decision making. When patients are not quickly successful at prescribed lifestyle improvements, they are often labeled as resistant. In health and wellness programming and coaching are we allowing our own bias to treat people the same way? Bias can take many forms — age, gender, race, ethnicity, weight, socio-economic class and more. This workshop will explore how implicit bias can affect our relationships with the people we serve and what we can do to shift our mindsets. We will look at how the stigma resulting from biased treatment and labeling sets up our clients for even more difficulty attaining the success we would like to see them achieve.

When we label people as resistant, we are often missing the real reasons for their lack of success at lasting lifestyle improvement. We will explore what we know about self-efficacy, the transtheoretical model of behavior change, social and environmental determinants of change, client bias and distrust, core competencies of coaching and motivational interviewing and how these topics can help us understand and serve our clients much more fairly, equitably and effectively.

Category: Health & Wellness
Michael Arloski, Ph.D.
Speaker
Michael Arloski, Ph.D.
CEO and Founder
Real Balance Global Wellness Services Inc.
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Intentionally Infusing Cultural Humility to Support Social and Emotional Wellness of Marginalized Populations
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Access to one’s desired optimal health and wellness can be inequitable, especially for marginalized populations. As health and wellness practitioners, we must consider the equity of access of those who identify as members of marginalized groups so we can better support their social and emotional wellness. The CDC acknowledges that people from certain minority groups have difficulty getting mental health care, which impacts emotional, psychological, and social well-being. This presentation will expose participants to the reality of inequitable access through experiential exercises. Facilitators will guide participants through case scenarios to identify barriers related to social and emotional wellness that may be encountered. Participants will end by identifying strategies to intentionally infuse cultural humility into interactions that address these barriers experienced by marginalized populations, Ultimately, participants will identify their ability to support patients/clients on their paths to address the barriers to achieving their optimal states of holistic health and wellness.

Category: Health & Wellness
Reyna Gilmore-Gordon, M.D.
Co-Speaker
Reyna Gilmore-Gordon, M.D.
Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist
Rikkisha Gilmore-Byrd, Dr.P.H., M.S., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Rikkisha Gilmore-Byrd, Dr.P.H., M.S., M.P.H.
Dean
Rasmussen University
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Mastering Menopause: Creating a Cross-Cultural Inclusion Approach to Positively Impact Your Aging Workforce
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

The topic of menopause is taboo in general but even more so in the workplace. Menopause-age women account for 30% of the US labor force, and menopause impacts many women at the height of their careers. One in four women will experience serious menopause symptoms, costing the U.S. workforce an estimated $1.8 billion of lost working time and each woman over $2,100 in direct and indirect healthcare costs and contributing to a decreased health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes. Menopause has a greater effect on Black and Hispanic women as they experience more menopausal symptoms and higher percentages of adverse work outcomes compared to white women.

Organizations would benefit from creating menopause policies and support for employees before and during menopause through a cross-cultural approach incorporating all dimensions of well-being while addressing challenges with cultural competency and racial and ethnic disparities. Implementing actionable strategies through the lens of social determinants of health (SDOH) serves as a solid foundation to benefit organizations helping employees manage and master menopause.

Category: Health & Wellness
Lana M. Saal, Ed.D.
Speaker
Lana M. Saal, Ed.D.
Well-being Innovator and Chief Executive Officer
The VitHealthity Group
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
The Role of Managers in Supporting Proactive Mental Health
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Many attitudes and behaviors have been found to prevent mental illness and support well-being. They fit into categories such as adaptability, safety, presence, connection, health behavior, and purpose. Fortunately many employees are trying to adopt one or more proactive mental health attitudes and behaviors. Managers can support their employees’ efforts to flourish. They can help create workgroup subcultures that embrace proactive mental health. This breakout session will teach managers how to:

  • Share a proactive mental health vision.
  • Serve as role models.
  • Influence key organizational decision-makers.
  • Align day-to-day cultural influences with positive practices.
  • Create a supportive social climate.
  • Track and celebrate progress.

Category: Health & Wellness
Judd Allen, Ph.D.
Speaker
Judd Allen, Ph.D.
President
Human Resources Institute, LLC
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Virtual Mindfulness-Based Training for a High-Stress, High-Burnout Workforce
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Public school teachers are at risk of burnout and leaving the profession. Evidence-based interventions such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) could reduce emotional distress to help mitigate burnout. A recent study was conducted to examine this. Teachers from a large urban school district were enrolled in an eight-week, employer-sponsored MBSR course to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary psychosocial effects of an MBSR course offered virtually to public school teachers. Participants completed baseline, eight week, and 12 week self-report assessments including questions on MBSR feasibility and acceptability as well as validated measures for stress (Perceived Stress Scale), anxiety (PROMIS Anxiety), depression (PROMIS Depression), mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire), self-compassion (Self Compassion Scale), and burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory). Feasibility and acceptability metrics included rates of recruitment, retention, and MBSR completion as well as open-ended responses on program delivery and engagement. Thirty participants were screened for inclusion and enrolled into the course. Twenty-eight (93%) participants completed the eight-week assessment and 26 (87%) participants completed the two assessments, respectively. Twenty-one (70%) participants completed either 1) at least seven or 2) at least six. Over time, there were significant improvements in all psychosocial measures (Wilcoxon signed-rank p< 0.05, Z=-4.1 to -2.2, ES=-0.8 to -0.5). The emotional exhaustion subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory showed significant reduction at eight and 12 weeks (Wilcoxon signed-rank p< 0.05). Participants reported that a remote MBSR course is feasible, while most seem to consider remote delivery acceptable. Offering hybrid options and strategies to overcome technological issues and enhance engagement may be needed. Improvements in psychosocial measures support potential benefits specifically emotional exhaustion.

Category: Health & Wellness
Bobby Russell, D.P.T.
Co-Speaker
Bobby Russell, D.P.T.
Physical Therapist
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Martha Shepherd, D.O., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Martha Shepherd, D.O., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer; Medical Director
Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) Teacher Health Plan; Vanderbilt Health at MNPS
Thursday April 11, 2024
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET
Keynote Session: Health Equity, Cultural Competency and the Impact on Patient Health
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET

A 2022 study published in the British Medical Journal made a compelling argument for the intricate connection between patient safety and health equity, patients from racial/ethnic minority and low-income backgrounds or those with disabilities were significantly more likely to experience preventable and in many cases, hospital-induced, adverse patient safety events (Wade et al. 2022). It has been well established that Black women in the United States are significantly more likely to die in childbirth than their white counterparts, and that their infants are more likely to die in the neonatal period when cared for by white physicians (Greenwood, et al. 2020). More than one in five adults identifying as LGBTQIA+ identifying adults report avoiding or delaying healthcare because of discrimination and over 25% of racial/ethnic minority seniors report experiencing discrimination based on their race/ethnicity from healthcare providers. Cultural competency, humility and sensitivity are essential to addressing these health disparities and eliminating health inequities. Health inequities, which exist because of unnecessary, unjust, or unfair barriers to health, are compounded and enabled by a myriad factors, including those internal to the healthcare delivery system as well as those external to it. In this presentation, Dr. Olayiwola will explore root causes of health and healthcare inequities and the implications of these inequities on health care costs, patient experiences, patient safety and clinical outcomes. We will also explore solutions to address and mitigate health inequities at the organizational, team and individual levels. Attendees will leave the lecture with actionable tools and solutions they can implement in their daily practice for equitable, safe, and culturally competent care.

Category: Health & Wellness
J. Nwando Olayiwola, M.D., M.P.H.
Speaker
J. Nwando Olayiwola, M.D., M.P.H.
Founder and CEO; Chief Health Equity Officer & SVP ; Adjunct Professor
Inspire Health Solutions, LLC; Humana, Inc.; The Ohio State University College of Medicine
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Empowering Worksite Well-Being Through Lifestyle Medicine
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Applying the six pillars of lifestyle medicine— a whole-food, plant-predominant eating pattern; physical activity; restorative sleep; stress management; avoidance of risky substances; and positive social connections—to a worksite wellness program is a unique and effective population health strategy. Doing so provides prevention for chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity increases well-being and decreases burnout among program participants. Learn how the Case Western Reserve University Wellness Program addresses lifestyle medicine through strategic development of multi-week, skills-based, behavior change programs. This session will describe a comprehensive approach to addressing lifestyle medicine at work, thereby increasing the likelihood of healthy behavior adoption and maintenance. Learn how to support organizational health needs and positively impact well-being through effective integration of lifestyle medicine principles.

Category: Health & Wellness
Deanna Duffy, M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Deanna Duffy, M.P.H.
Wellness Manager
Case Western Reserve University
Elizabeth Click, D.N.P, N.D., R.N.
Co-Speaker
Elizabeth Click, D.N.P, N.D., R.N.
Medical Director; Associate Professor
Case Western Reserve University
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Leveraging EHR and HRIS Data to Inform Clinician Well-Being Programs
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Healthcare organizations use surveys to measure clinician functioning and tailor interventions. However, clinicians with marginalized identities respond less frequently to surveys, potentially leading to nonresponse bias. This bias, due to systematic differences between respondents and non-respondents, may compromise survey validity, skew outcome estimations, and impede the development of equitable interventions. In this study, we found that non-respondents were 4.98 times more likely to leave the job immediately following a survey, and the difference remained significant for five subsequent quarters. There was no significant difference in response rate by demographic variables. We used machine learning with EHR and HR also IS data to gain additional insights beyond those garnered from surveys alone. In particular, preliminary results show that nonrespondents not only are more likely to leave, but they are also ess productive and have different risk drivers for burnout and turnover. Overall, we find that utilizing readily available, objective data from EHR and HRIS systems in addition to existing survey results could allow for a more comprehensive view of the workplace, enabling healthcare leadership to develop truly inclusive wellbeing programs.

Category: Health & Wellness
Aubrey Rhodes, Ph.D. Candidate
Co-Speaker
Aubrey Rhodes, Ph.D. Candidate
Clinical Psychologist Consultant
Atalan Tech
Xi (Sisi) Hu, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Xi (Sisi) Hu, Ph.D.
Program Fellow of the Labor & Worklife Program
Center for Labor & a Just Economy, Harvard Law School
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Meeting the Needs of Many: Health Promotion and Health Equity in Ever-Changing Environments
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

In these unprecedented times, health promotion professionals are responsible for engaging with communities to enhance their understanding of factors that contribute as risks or protections for their health outcomes. Equity in these engagements is vital in ensuring communities receive palatable insights, information, and guidance to optimize population health. These efforts are highly intricate and require integration of classical scientific theory and research applied to contemporary socio-cultural factors. Equity in health promotion requires customized considerations and data-driven efforts to define and assess community compositions, disaggregate original data sources, and develop multi-sector community partnerships. Also, addressing issues that marginalized and underserved communities experience from public health and other systems is critical in recognizing additional efforts that are necessary to build equity and trust in health promotion. By leveraging additional partnerships, health promotion professionals can further optimize ways to meet educational needs of underserved populations in their respective locales. Through combing these components, health promotion professionals can effectively define and apply health education and risk reduction efforts to all communities without bias and in terms they can understand and benefit. The contribution is invaluable to the art and science of public health and to the wellness of populations.

Category: Health & Wellness
Tralonda Triplett, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Speaker
Tralonda Triplett, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Director of Operations
Institute for Successful Leadership, Inc.
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Pap-a-Thon: Planning a Women's Health Event in Your Community
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) women experience higher cervical cancer incidence than white women. Regular Pap tests reduce at least 80% of cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. When committing to a cervical cancer screening event, providers, and health system staff must address the physical, spirtual, mental and emotional needs of their clients. Locally planned Pap-a-Thons afford tribal health clinics the time to pay attention to each client and address culturally respected cervical cancer screening practices. The Bay Mills Indian Community successfully increased cervical cancer screening in their clinic population by hosting a Pap-a-Thon. The success of this event resulted in the development of the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan's (ITCM) Pap-a-Thon Toolkit. The Pap-a-Thon Toolkit is designed to tailor a women’s health event to unique communities. We will walk through the toolkit, share lessons learned and consider adaptations to the community the audience services.

Category: Health & Wellness
Beth I. Sieloff, M.P.H.
Speaker
Beth I. Sieloff, M.P.H.
Public Health Specialist, Cancer Prevention and Control Programs
Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
The Role of Managers in Supporting Proactive Mental Health
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Many attitudes and behaviors have been found to prevent mental illness and support well-being. They fit into categories such as adaptability, safety, presence, connection, health behavior, and purpose. Fortunately many employees are trying to adopt one or more proactive mental health attitudes and behaviors. Managers can support their employees’ efforts to flourish. They can help create workgroup subcultures that embrace proactive mental health. This breakout session will teach managers how to:

  • Share a proactive mental health vision.
  • Serve as role models.
  • Influence key organizational decision-makers.
  • Align day-to-day cultural influences with positive practices.
  • Create a supportive social climate.
  • Track and celebrate progress.

Category: Health & Wellness
Judd Allen, Ph.D.
Speaker
Judd Allen, Ph.D.
President
Human Resources Institute, LLC
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
A Systems-Based Approach to Achieving Health Equity in Well-Being Programs
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Since their popularization in the second half of the 20th century, worksite well-being programs have been focused on participant engagement and outcomes. Early evaluation efforts explored the difference between participants and non-participant outcomes, with the understandable goal of measuring program value. Given that the preponderance of programs have been vendor-sponsored, this objective has been important for the sake of maintaining existing employer clients and attracting new ones. However, the emphasis on program outcomes has significantly and unfortunately - shifted the focus of both vendors and employers away from program non-participants. As a result, employers and vendors alike have become accustomed to accepting participation rates in the 50 percent range as an acceptable "normal".

Growing awareness of health inequities in the United States — and particularly individuals with employer-sponsored insurance—has prompted a critical evaluation of inequities in workforce well-being and employer-provided program offerings. Are these programs accessible and relevant to all members of the workforce? Do they provide equitable value for all employees and their family members? Or do they inadvertently worsen health inequities?

The goal of this session is to bring attention to well-being program non-participants by providing insight into their perspectives and experience. Included is an exploration of reasons and systems-based barriers contributing to non-participation, as well as a discussion of the ways to thoughtfully address these issues and foster enhanced workforce health equity.

Category: Health & Wellness
Bruce Sherman, M.D.
Co-Speaker
Bruce Sherman, M.D.
Medical Advisor; Adjunct Associate Professor
National Alliance of Healthcare Purchaser Coalitions; University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Emily Stiehl, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Emily Stiehl, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
University of Illinois at Chicago
Preethi Pratap, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Preethi Pratap, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Empowered Refusal: The New Science of How to Say No That Puts You in Charge of Your Life
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

In this interactive workshop, Dr. Patrick will share:

  • Why empowered refusal is a valuable superskill to help you say "no" in a way that does not invite pushback from others.
  • How to identify why you sometimes say "yes" when you want to say "no "
  • A practical lens that helps you separate the “good-for-me” from the “not-good-for-me” activities and engagements that come your way.
  • A toolkit of three competencies you need to effectively communicate an empowered "no" response.
  • A framework to establish and implement personal policies that empower your refusal.
  • How to use empowered refusal to manage difficult askers, strengthen your relationships and realize your full potential.

Category: Health & Wellness
Vanessa Patrick, Ph.D.
Speaker
Vanessa Patrick, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Research, Executive Director of Doctoral Programs (PhD/DBA) & Bauer Professor of Marketing
Bauer College of Business, University of Houston
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
From Addiction to Advocacy: Fostering a Supportive and Inclusive Workplace for Employees With Substance Use Disorder
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD), “substance use disorder costs employers $81 billion annually through lost productivity and absenteeism, turnover and recruitment costs, workplace accidents, health care expenses, and disability and workers' compensation”.

The idea of addressing substance abuse in the workplace is daunting for most leaders. They often lack the confidence, knowledge, and tools necessary to engage in these courageous conversations and take the necessary actions that can potentially save lives. But what is at stake if they continue to ignore or pretend the problem is not affecting the workplace?

During this interactive workshop, you will hear how Isabelle’s personal story of overcoming addiction has led her to become a leader in the field of addiction awareness, education, and prevention. Participants will be introduced to the NCS and NORC Substance Use Cost Calculator tool and will be presented with staggering data about the prevalence and impact of substance use, misuse, and abuse in the workplace. Isabelle will provide participants with key strategies for preventing substance use disorders in the workplace and ways in which leaders can remove barriers to seeking help. Participants will receive practical guidance on taking immediate actionable steps toward mitigating the problem and fostering a workforce that supports recovery.

Category: Health & Wellness
Isabelle Wettergren, M.A.
Speaker
Isabelle Wettergren, M.A.
Workplace Wellness Consultant, Trainer and Recovery Coach
Wettergren & Associates
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Presence: Time and the Path of Wholeness
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Excess stress, burnout, anxiety, fatigue, reactivity and even perfectionism are results of time pressure and a sense of urgency brought on by 24/7 workaholic social norms and time compression. Many studies as well as common observations indicate that a lack of time is a primary reason (aka “excuse”) for not participating in wellness programs or failing to follow up on initial plans. However, time here mostly refers to clock time. There are other more uplifting and nourishing views of time. The mindset shift and capacities provided in this session are simple tools for cultivating healthier time attitudes.

In the field of health promotion, there is a gradual mindset shift from health to wellness, to well-being, and to wholeness. This shift is connected to how providers (e.g., wellness coaches and directors) can bring and foster presence with their clients and employees. Being present in one’s life requires well-being, and providers bring great value when they can support others by saying “My well-being is worth my presence.” This highly interactive session provides exercises for bringing presence based on the presenter's book series Quest for Presence. Related capacities of acceptance, flow, and synchronicity will also be reviewed with time for self-assessment and discussion. This session aligns personal and professional development. It is “time” for wellness/well-being providers to help themselves and others get off the disease-promoting treadmill. It is time for our entire field to “do time” differently.

Category: Health & Wellness
Joel Bennett, Ph.D.
Speaker
Joel Bennett, Ph.D.
President
Organizational Wellness and Learning Systems (OWLS)
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
The Future of Workforce Well-Being Is Leadership
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Health promotion practitioners are primed to lead the future of practice for workforce well-being. But leading well-being goes beyond traditional problem-solving and requires dynamic, people-focused methods. The organizations that acknowledge the complex relationship between work and well-being are making well-being a priority, and they’re performing better, retaining talent, and seeing other favorable results for their businesses and their people because of it. In The U.S. Surgeon General’s Framework for Workplace Mental Health & Well-Being published, in 2022, Dr. Murthy takes a clear stance on this, stating, "Organizational leaders, managers, supervisors, and workers alike have an unprecedented opportunity to examine the role of work in our lives and explore ways to better enable all workers to thrive within the workplace and beyond".

In this session, participants will explore the leadership styles that are connected to positively impacting well-being and flourishing for employees. Participants will be invited to challenge their perspectives on the relationship between work and well-being and to begin their own development journey to becoming trusted leaders of well-being.

Category: Health & Wellness
Marissa Kalkman, M.S.
Speaker
Marissa Kalkman, M.S.
Learning and Engagement Manager
Kern National Network for Flourishing in Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Centering Men in Mental Health Promotion Efforts - From Program Planning to Implementation and Evaluation
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Despite the disparities that exist in men’s health, this topic is often overlooked in health promotion efforts. This may happen for many reasons, including the fact that oftentimes, professionals don't recognize that there is a disparity, and if they do, they aren’t sure how to address it.

This session will provide an overview of the current state of men’s mental health. Because men can often face significant, and unique, barriers to positive mental health, the session will focus specifically on this dimension of health. A showcase of health promotion efforts that focuses on men’s mental health and what makes these programs successful will be included. There will be a discussion on the importance of framing health promotion efforts utilizing both cultural competency and an approach rooted in intersectionality. This session will conclude with participants developing talking points to effectively advocate for men’s health from this lens. These talking points can be utilized at all stages of program planning, implementation and evaluation to advance health equity for men.

Category: Health & Wellness
Susan Milstein, Ph.D., M.A.
Speaker
Susan Milstein, Ph.D., M.A.
Lead Consultant
Milstein Health Consulting
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Financial Wellness From the Financial Services Sector
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Inflation is rising, the economy seems to be making daily headlines, and employees are concerned that their paychecks aren't going to stretch. Financial wellness is vital to overall employee well-being, but how do you incorporate programs that move the needle? Many wellness professionals don’t have the background to offer financial wellness services and struggle to offer programming that makes a difference in employees’ bottom lines. In this session, a financial services organization’s wellness coordinator brings you actionable steps to change the way you view and implement financial wellness programs. You will get a clear view of how financial wellness can help associates make gains in their finances while implementing other positive behaviors. From financial education to plans such as a wellness reimbursement account, you will learn how financial wellness can be built for your employee population and the gains both the organization and the employees will find.

Category: Health & Wellness
Sam Dolezal, Ed.D., M.S.E, M.S.
Speaker
Sam Dolezal, Ed.D., M.S.E, M.S.
Wellbeing Officer
Union Bank & Trust
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Intentionally Infusing Cultural Humility to Support Social and Emotional Wellness of Marginalized Populations
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Access to one’s desired optimal health and wellness can be inequitable, especially for marginalized populations. As health and wellness practitioners, we must consider the equity of access of those who identify as members of marginalized groups so we can better support their social and emotional wellness. The CDC acknowledges that people from certain minority groups have difficulty getting mental health care, which impacts emotional, psychological, and social well-being. This presentation will expose participants to the reality of inequitable access through experiential exercises. Facilitators will guide participants through case scenarios to identify barriers related to social and emotional wellness that may be encountered. Participants will end by identifying strategies to intentionally infuse cultural humility into interactions that address these barriers experienced by marginalized populations, Ultimately, participants will identify their ability to support patients/clients on their paths to address the barriers to achieving their optimal states of holistic health and wellness.

Category: Health & Wellness
Reyna Gilmore-Gordon, M.D.
Co-Speaker
Reyna Gilmore-Gordon, M.D.
Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist
Rikkisha Gilmore-Byrd, Dr.P.H., M.S., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Rikkisha Gilmore-Byrd, Dr.P.H., M.S., M.P.H.
Dean
Rasmussen University
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
Mastering Menopause: Creating a Cross-Cultural Inclusion Approach to Positively Impact Your Aging Workforce
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

The topic of menopause is taboo in general but even more so in the workplace. Menopause-age women account for 30% of the US labor force, and menopause impacts many women at the height of their careers. One in four women will experience serious menopause symptoms, costing the U.S. workforce an estimated $1.8 billion of lost working time and each woman over $2,100 in direct and indirect healthcare costs and contributing to a decreased health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes. Menopause has a greater effect on Black and Hispanic women as they experience more menopausal symptoms and higher percentages of adverse work outcomes compared to white women.

Organizations would benefit from creating menopause policies and support for employees before and during menopause through a cross-cultural approach incorporating all dimensions of well-being while addressing challenges with cultural competency and racial and ethnic disparities. Implementing actionable strategies through the lens of social determinants of health (SDOH) serves as a solid foundation to benefit organizations helping employees manage and master menopause.

Category: Health & Wellness
Lana M. Saal, Ed.D.
Speaker
Lana M. Saal, Ed.D.
Well-being Innovator and Chief Executive Officer
The VitHealthity Group
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET
WELL Empowered: The Effectiveness of a Digital Health Application on Driving Engagement and Health Behavior Change for Members With Increased Cardiovascular Risk
3:15-4:20 p.m. ET

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Lifestyle changes required for healthy chronic disease self-management can be further complicated for individuals facing social and economic challenges. Innovations in primary care delivery in recent years have shown the value of care interventions outside visits with primary care providers, such as digital health programs. Well Dot, Inc., partnered with Church Health, a charitable clinic in Shelby County, Tennessee, that serves Memphis' underinsured, to evaluate factors associated with the adoption of, and engagement in, a digital platform designed to advance member health (the Well app). The Well App uses an unprecedented combination of personalized digital guidance, motivation, and rewards paired with concierge human support from Well Guides to engage members in the advancement of their health. In this session, we will review how a digital-human hybrid experience applies modern behavioral economics to engage members, empower action-oriented health behavioral change, and amplify existing resources towards improving individuals’ whole health, as tested in this clinical setting for underserved populations.

Category: Health & Wellness
Laura Hagopian, M.D.
Panelist
Laura Hagopian, M.D.
Medical Director
Well
Rachel Depperschmidt, M.P.H.
Panelist
Rachel Depperschmidt, M.P.H.
Director, Population Health & Quality Improvement
Church Health
Ray Sawyer
Panel Facilitator
Ray Sawyer
Director, Community Health Partnerships
Well
Robert Espinosa, M.B.A.
Panelist
Robert Espinosa, M.B.A.
Senior Director of Health Outcomes
Well
4:45-5:45 p.m. ET
Special Plenary—Pride, Prejudice and Medical Progress: The Journey to LGBTQ+ Health Equity
4:45-5:45 p.m. ET

Cultural tides are shifting— Over 7% of the US population identifies as part of the LGBTQ+ community, and Gen Z represents an impressive 25% of that community. While we celebrate increasing acceptance and visibility, disparities in health, communication, and access persist. Stressors stemming from historical discrimination and contemporary backlash place LGBTQ+ individuals of all ages at elevated risks for physical and mental health inequities.

However, amidst these challenges lie opportunities to enhance the health outcomes of LGBTQ+ individuals, and in doing so, enrich our broader society. In this presentation, we will embark on a journey to empower participants in understanding their roles as active allies and advocates.

Category: Health & Wellness
Jessica Halem, M.B.A.
Speaker
Jessica Halem, M.B.A.
Senior Director
Eidos LGBTQ+ Health Initiative, University of Pennsylvania
Friday April 12, 2024
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET
Keynote Session: Addressing Tectonic Partiality in Medicine and Health Care
9:00-10:45 a.m. ET

As a physician-scientist-epidemiologist, Dr. Michelle A. Albert has had a longstanding commitment to health equity. She is engaged in cutting-edge research that innovatively seeks to incorporate “biology” with social determinants of health to transform cardiovascular disease (CVD) science and healthcare of global populations (i.e,“the biology of adversity”). A central component of her current work focuses on developing innovative implementation strategies to curb adversity related CVD risk, particularly in women and diverse racial and ethnic populations with a focus on cumulative toxic stress.

Category: Health & Wellness
Michelle A. Albert, M.D., M.P.H.
Speaker
Michelle A. Albert, M.D., M.P.H.
Walter A. Haas-Lucie Stern Endowed Chair in Cardiology and Professor of Medicine; Associate Dean of Admissions; Director
University of California, San Francisco; UCSF School of Medicine; CeNter for the StUdy of AdveRsiTy and CardiovascUlaR DiseasE (NURTURE Center)
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Building Effective Health Communication and Community Engagement Strategies to Address Vaccine Hesitancy in Racial and Ethnic Communities
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Community Catalyst’s mission is to build the power of people to create a health system rooted in race equity and health justice, and a society where health is a right for all. Since 2021, Community Catalyst has supported the CDC’s adult vaccination efforts through the Vaccine Equity and Access Program (VEAP) with the goal of increasing vaccination coverage for adults in racial and/or ethnic populations experiencing disparities in the US. Over the past two years, Community Catalyst funded over 90 community-based organizations (CBOs) to develop and implement effective health communication and community engagement strategies designed to increase adult vaccination coverage, with a focus on COVID-19 and influenza vaccines.

To support these efforts, Community Catalyst provided one-on-one and group technical assistance and structured learning opportunities, CBOs were also provided a robust immunization toolkit designed through needs assessments and in-depth interviews. Preliminary evaluations indicate that the campaign and toolkit were well received in communities and supportive of the diverse range of communication needs in the individual communities. The complete evaluation results will be shared along with the tools and resources most helpful for community-level communication strategies, resource needs for CBOs, and technical support required for a dispersed national communications campaign.

This practice-based presentation demonstrates that with effective support and technical assistance, CBOs can be an essential part of a viable strategic effort to improve public health outcomes for racially and ethnically diverse, hard to reach, and disparately impacted communities. Public health practitioners, particularly in efforts requiring a complex ground strategy, can identify how to effectively partner within communities to increase the reach and effectiveness of their programs.

Category: Health & Wellness
Calondra Tibbs, M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Calondra Tibbs, M.P.H.
CEO
Trifecta Advising, LLC
Sheree Keitt, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Sheree Keitt, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Director, Vaccine Equity
Community Catalyst
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Financial Wellness From the Financial Services Sector
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Inflation is rising, the economy seems to be making daily headlines, and employees are concerned that their paychecks aren't going to stretch. Financial wellness is vital to overall employee well-being, but how do you incorporate programs that move the needle? Many wellness professionals don’t have the background to offer financial wellness services and struggle to offer programming that makes a difference in employees’ bottom lines. In this session, a financial services organization’s wellness coordinator brings you actionable steps to change the way you view and implement financial wellness programs. You will get a clear view of how financial wellness can help associates make gains in their finances while implementing other positive behaviors. From financial education to plans such as a wellness reimbursement account, you will learn how financial wellness can be built for your employee population and the gains both the organization and the employees will find.

Category: Health & Wellness
Sam Dolezal, Ed.D., M.S.E, M.S.
Speaker
Sam Dolezal, Ed.D., M.S.E, M.S.
Wellbeing Officer
Union Bank & Trust
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Nature for All: Increasing Access to Nature Among Diverse Populations
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

Spending time in natural environments conveys a variety of physical and mental health benefits including decreased blood pressure, improved immune function, decreased anxiety, and overall restoration. While nature is often viewed as a free resource, there are numerous barriers that keep many populations from fully benefiting from nature. Factors such as access, safety, experience, cost and time as well as racism, discrimination and land-based trauma all affect the relationship and sense of belonging to nature for different communities. This interactive session will start by exploring some historical relationships between BIPOC and natural environments and how these impact time spent in nature today. Next, big data tools including cell phone records and social media scraping will be explored to measure current disparities. Finally, we will explore current programs designed to increase access to nature for all and eliminate current disparities. Participants will leave with action-based strategies to enhance time spent in nature in their worksites and communities.

Category: Health & Wellness
Jay Maddock, Ph.D.
Co-Speaker
Jay Maddock, Ph.D.
Director of the Center for Health and Nature; Regents Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
Houston Methodist Research Institute; Texas A & M University
Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Co-Speaker
Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Associate Professor; Director of Public Health Outcomes and Effects of the Built Environment Laboratory; Co-Director of NatureRx
University of Maryland
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET
Psychedelic-Assisted Therapies: Science, Application and Health Equity
11:00 a.m.-12:05 p.m. ET

The psychedelic renaissance is fully underway, evidenced by exponential growth in the scientific literature examining psychedelic compounds as medicines. The primary focus is on the treatment of mental illness, but psychedelic therapies may also benefit other health conditions, especially given their anti-inflammatory effects. Shifts in the regulatory and business environment are occurring rapidly and there is hope for potent and long-lasting healing. From a health equity perspective, however, there is a problem. These therapies are expensive, mostly not reimbursed by employers as a qualified medical expense, and are not particularly inclusive (e.g., more than 80% of participants in psychedelic clinical trials are white, and most are cisgender and straight). In this session, we will examine the science of psychedelic therapies, their potential application in health promotion and in the workforce, and equity issues in research and implementation. Dr. Swoap will present a study of a psychedelic-assisted therapy used in a group setting and discuss the costs and benefits of ketamine-assisted therapy using this modality.

Category: Health & Wellness
Bob Swoap, Ph.D.
Speaker
Bob Swoap, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Expressive Arts Therapy
Warren Wilson College
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Centering Men in Mental Health Promotion Efforts - From Program Planning to Implementation and Evaluation
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Despite the disparities that exist in men’s health, this topic is often overlooked in health promotion efforts. This may happen for many reasons, including the fact that oftentimes, professionals don't recognize that there is a disparity, and if they do, they aren’t sure how to address it.

This session will provide an overview of the current state of men’s mental health. Because men can often face significant, and unique, barriers to positive mental health, the session will focus specifically on this dimension of health. A showcase of health promotion efforts that focuses on men’s mental health and what makes these programs successful will be included. There will be a discussion on the importance of framing health promotion efforts utilizing both cultural competency and an approach rooted in intersectionality. This session will conclude with participants developing talking points to effectively advocate for men’s health from this lens. These talking points can be utilized at all stages of program planning, implementation and evaluation to advance health equity for men.

Category: Health & Wellness
Susan Milstein, Ph.D., M.A.
Co-Speaker
Susan Milstein, Ph.D., M.A.
Lead Consultant
Milstein Health Consulting
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
From Addiction to Advocacy: Fostering a Supportive and Inclusive Workplace for Employees With Substance Use Disorder
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD), “substance use disorder costs employers $81 billion annually through lost productivity and absenteeism, turnover and recruitment costs, workplace accidents, health care expenses, and disability and workers' compensation”.

The idea of addressing substance abuse in the workplace is daunting for most leaders. They often lack the confidence, knowledge, and tools necessary to engage in these courageous conversations and take the necessary actions that can potentially save lives. But what is at stake if they continue to ignore or pretend the problem is not affecting the workplace?

During this interactive workshop, you will hear how Isabelle’s personal story of overcoming addiction has led her to become a leader in the field of addiction awareness, education, and prevention. Participants will be introduced to the NCS and NORC Substance Use Cost Calculator tool and will be presented with staggering data about the prevalence and impact of substance use, misuse, and abuse in the workplace. Isabelle will provide participants with key strategies for preventing substance use disorders in the workplace and ways in which leaders can remove barriers to seeking help. Participants will receive practical guidance on taking immediate actionable steps toward mitigating the problem and fostering a workforce that supports recovery.

Category: Health & Wellness
Isabelle Wettergren, M.A.
Speaker
Isabelle Wettergren, M.A.
Workplace Wellness Consultant, Trainer and Recovery Coach
Wettergren & Associates
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Going Beyond Bias to Break the Labeling Cycle of Patient/Client Resistance to Lifestyle Improvement
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

There is strong evidence base that implicit bias can have negative, if not disastrous, effects upon medical decision making. When patients are not quickly successful at prescribed lifestyle improvements, they are often labeled as resistant. In health and wellness programming and coaching are we allowing our own bias to treat people the same way? Bias can take many forms — age, gender, race, ethnicity, weight, socio-economic class and more. This workshop will explore how implicit bias can affect our relationships with the people we serve and what we can do to shift our mindsets. We will look at how the stigma resulting from biased treatment and labeling sets up our clients for even more difficulty attaining the success we would like to see them achieve.

When we label people as resistant, we are often missing the real reasons for their lack of success at lasting lifestyle improvement. We will explore what we know about self-efficacy, the transtheoretical model of behavior change, social and environmental determinants of change, client bias and distrust, core competencies of coaching and motivational interviewing and how these topics can help us understand and serve our clients much more fairly, equitably and effectively.

Category: Health & Wellness
Michael Arloski, Ph.D.
Speaker
Michael Arloski, Ph.D.
CEO and Founder
Real Balance Global Wellness Services Inc.
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET
Veteran-Specific Health Promotion
1:45-2:50 p.m. ET

Our country has been battling the current opioid epidemic for decades. Tragically, the number of military personnel and veterans who struggle with wellness, addiction and mental health issues is considerably higher than civilians. This breakout session will address the additional causative factors adversely affecting those who have served our country so valiantly, along with strategies and programs to integrate into community, medical and mental health practices. The presentation will include health-promoting, veteran-specific information and questions that wellness advocates, caregivers and healthcare professionals need to ask veterans under their care. This includes screening patients for military history, veteran-specific health risks, treatment modalities, and more to help our veterans reach and sustain overall wellness and sobriety. Overall wellness programs include screening tests, immunizations, social connectedness, recreational therapy, physical activity, spiritual presence, healthy living, stress management, disease prevention and more.

Category: Health & Wellness
Christi Sherrill, M.P.H.
Speaker
Christi Sherrill, M.P.H.
Program Manager
Oklahoma State University Center for Rural Health

Conference Schedule
   (All times are Pacific Time)

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

​6:30 am - 7:30 am 
​ Activity Sessions
 9:00 am - 10:45 am ​
 Keynote
​ 11:00 am - 12:05 pm 
​ Concurrent Sessions
​ 1:45 pm - 2:50 pm 
​ Concurrent Sessions
​ 3:15 pm - 4:20 pm 
​ Concurrent Sessions
​4:45 pm - 5:45 pm 
​ Activity Sessions
​6:30 pm - 7:30 pm 
​ Welcome Reception

Thursday​ , April 14, 2022

​6:30 am - 7:30 am 
​ Activity Sessions
 9:00 am - 10:45 am ​
Keynote 
 11:00 am - 12:05 pm ​
​ Concurrent Sessions
 1:45 pm - 2:50 pm ​
​ Concurrent Sessions
3:15 pm - 4:20 pm ​
​ Concurrent Sessions
​4:45 pm - 5:45 pm 
​  Activity Sessions

Friday​, April 15, 2022

​6:30 am - 7:30 am 
​ Acitivity Sessions
 9:00 am - 10:45 am ​
Keynote
​ 11:00 am - 12:05 pm 
​ Concurrent Sessions
1:45 pm - 2:50 pm​ 
​ Concurrent Sessions
​3:15 pm - 4:15 pm 
​ Farewell Reception